Darwin’s finches have nothing on these chameleons

first_imgDarwin’s finches have nothing on these chameleons When it comes to eating hard-shelled bugs, the wildly varied species in the Bradypodion genus of dwarf chameleons have evolved an incredible array of a special part for doing the work: their heads. Scientists long wondered why these closely related South African lizards had such diverse noggins—some wide, some tall, and some covered with scaly head or chin frills. So they looked at the diets of 14 of the 17 known chameleon species, and compared them with the lizards’ head type. Researchers found the size and shape of a chameleon’s head matched its preferred diet, they report in Functional Ecology. For example, forest lizards with taller heads generally ate softer foods, including butterflies, dragonflies, and even other reptiles. Those with crestlike shapes on top were able to bite harder, ideal for eating larger insects. But the plains lizards—most of which lack crests—tend to have wider mouths, which help them crunch on smaller but harder beetlelike bugs, even without the attractive head feature. The chameleons living in South Africa’s Fynbos plains are also smaller than their forest-dwelling cousins, possibly as a result of having less food available. The comparatively colorful forest morphs are likely the ancestral version of the species, which evolved as Africa’s southern forests shrank. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) By Joshua Rapp LearnMar. 31, 2017 , 12:30 PMlast_img read more

Artificial intelligence can turn 2D photos into real-world objects

first_img People have no trouble looking at a photo and understanding the 3D shapes of the objects within—people, cars, Shiba Inus. But computers, with little experience in the real world, aren’t so smart—yet. Now, scientists have created a new “unwrapping” method that comes much closer. They started by teaching an algorithm to treat 3D objects as 2D surfaces. Imagine, for example, hollowing out a mountainous globe and flattening it into a rectangular map, with each point on the surface displaying latitude, longitude, and altitude. After much practice, the new machine-learning algorithm learned to translate photos of 3D objects (like the first row of planes, above) into 2D surfaces, which can then be “stitched” into 3D forms. Researchers trained it to reconstruct cars, airplanes, and hands in almost any posture. Whereas an earlier method warped sedans into hatchbacks and rendered planes birdlike (see the second row of airplanes, above), this new method could more accurately infer 3D shapes from photos, the authors reported this week at the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition, in Honolulu. The new program, called SurfNet (after the word “surface”), could also invent brand new, realistic-looking 3D shapes for cars, planes, and hands. Future applications might include designing objects for virtual and augmented reality, creating 3D maps of rooms for robot navigation, and designing computer interfaces controlled with hand gestures. Thumbs up.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) Artificial intelligence can turn 2D photos into real-world objects By Matthew HutsonJul. 27, 2017 , 4:15 PMcenter_img Purdue University last_img read more

Land plants arose earlier than thought—and may have had a bigger impact on the evolution of animals

first_img Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences We have land plants to thank for the oxygen we breathe. And now we have a better idea of when they took to land in the first place. While the oldest known fossils of land plants are 420 million years old, researchers have now determined that pond scum first made landfall almost 100 million years earlier.  “[This] study has important global implications, because we know early plants cooled the climate and increased the oxygen level in the Earth’s atmosphere,” conditions that supported the expansion of terrestrial animal life, says Tim Lenton, an earth system scientist at the University of Exeter in the United Kingdom who was not involved with the work. For decades biologists have been trying to come up with a reliable birth date for land plants. Lacking backbones and hard shells, plants leave relatively little behind in the fossil record, so researchers suspect even the oldest plant fossils don’t represent the first flora. Some scientists have tried to use plant genetic data as “molecular clocks”—knowing a typical mutation rate, they can estimate how long ago various species split based upon their differences in DNA—to figure out their evolutionary history. But they have been unable to sort out the lowest, or earliest, branches of the plant family tree. At that base, vascular plants—which include the trees, crops, and flowers we are most familiar with—came along sometime after liverworts, hornworts, and mosses. Yet the order in which those three other groups appeared has been a mystery and has stymied molecular clock studies. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Philip Donoghue thought that if he brought enough computer power to bear on this problem, he could solve this mystery. Donoghue, a paleobiologist at the University of Bristol in the United Kingdom, and his colleagues started with previously collected genetic data on more than 100 plant and algal species. They tested every permutation of the relationships of the four groups of plants with several kinds of these analyses and factored in the ages of dozens of plant fossils as a reality check. The exact configuration of the base of the plant family tree doesn’t matter to dating the first land plants, Donoghue and his colleagues report today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. All the analyses indicate that land plants first appeared about 500 million years ago, during the Cambrian period, when the development of multicellular animal species took off. The new analysis “shows that the first land plants arose earlier than we thought, regardless of current uncertainties about which land plants evolved first,” Lenton says.Donoghue’s team has also applied its computer power toward resolving these uncertainties. Plant scientists once considered liverwort the most primitive existing plant because it lacks roots and pores for gas and water exchange, but a few recent studies had suggested that liverwortlike plants were not the earliest land plants. Donoghue now agrees. Liverworts are most closely related to mosses and once had roots and pores but lost those traits over time, his team reports this month in Current Biology. “The assumption has been that the ancestral plant is physiologically like a liverwort,” Donoghue says. But his group’s analysis suggests that ancestor likely had rudimentary pores and roots, and thus might grow better, process more soil and more carbon dioxide, and therefore have been more influential in Earth’s biogeochemistry than researchers have thought. “It’s nice to see they came to the same conclusion that we did” about liverworts, says Jim Leebens-Mack, a plant evolutionary biologist at the University of Georgia in Athens who helped gather the data Donoghue used for the new analysis.Leebens-Mack also praises the study that calculated when land plants appeared as the most comprehensive to date. If Donoghue’s results are right, “This changes the entire timeline for the origin of terrestrial life and the subsequent pace of evolutionary change in plants and associated animal (and fungal) groups,” says Pamela Soltis, a plant evolutionary biologist at the University of Florida in Gainesville. “Also, these earlier dates would mean that changes to the Earth happened at a slower pace than we might otherwise think.”Leebens-Mack is still cautious. Molecular clock analyses always come up with older dates than fossils, he notes, so “I always take these estimates with a pretty big grain of salt.” By Elizabeth PennisiFeb. 19, 2018 , 9:35 AMcenter_img Plant scientists once considered liverwort the most primitive existing plant. Land plants arose earlier than thought—and may have had a bigger impact on the evolution of animalslast_img read more

Jupiter’s chaotic storms have roots deep beneath its surface

first_img Jupiter’s chaotic storms have roots deep beneath its surface NASA/JPL/MSSS/Gerald Eichstädt/Justin Cowart/Flickr (CC BY) By Paul VoosenMar. 7, 2018 , 1:00 PMcenter_img The gaseous veil of Jupiter’s surface has long cast a pall over scientists’ quest to understand the giant planet’s depths. In particular, researchers have debated whether the bands of east-west winds that sculpt Jupiter’s distinctive surface, complete with the curlicues of stormy cyclones, extend deeper into the planet, or are merely superficial. Now, a series of papers from NASA’s Juno spacecraft, published today in Nature, has revealed that the roots of Jupiter’s winds indeed run deep. Since arriving at the gas giant in 2016, Juno has swung around the planet in an elliptical 53-day orbit; with each pass, Jupiter’s gravity has tugged the spacecraft back and forth, revealing glimpses of its interior through Doppler shifts in Juno’s radio signal collected on Earth. In these data, Juno’s scientists discovered an asymmetry in Jupiter’s north-south gravitational field that reflected shifting masses driven by rising winds from 3000 kilometers deep within the planet. These flows of hydrogen and helium, the team shows, are driven up by energy lost from the planet’s deeper interior, which rotates like a solid because of crushing high pressures. When compared with similar observations taken by Cassini before its dive into Saturn last year, the NASA missions could soon clarify the internal dynamics of gas giants, helping understand their origins—and the composition of worlds beyond our solar system.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

Debate intensifies over speed of expanding universe

first_img Debate intensifies over speed of expanding universe The peak brightness of red giants in distant galaxies represents a new way to calculate the Hubble constant. This week, leading experts at clocking one of the most contested numbers in the cosmos—the Hubble constant, the rate at which the universe expands—gathered in hopes that new measurements could point the way out of a brewing storm in cosmology.No luck so far. A hotly anticipated new cosmic yardstick, reliant on red giants, has served only to muddle the debate about the actual value of the constant, and other measurements brought no resolution. “It was the craziest conference I’ve been to,” said Daniel Scolnic, an astrophysicist at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. “Everyone felt like they were on this rollercoaster.”The meeting, at the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics in Santa Barbara, California, was the latest episode in a saga stretching back to the 1920s, when Edwin Hubble established that the farther one looks into space, the faster galaxies are speeding away from Earth. Since then, scientists have devoted entire careers to refining the rate of that flow, Hubble’s eponymous constant, or H0. But recently, the problem has hardened into a transdisciplinary dispute.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)On one side are cosmologists who gather data from the greatest distances, such as a map of the big bang’s afterglow recorded by the European satellite Planck. They compare the apparent size of features in that afterglow with their actual size, as predicted by theory, to calculate an H0 of about 67. That means distant galaxies should be flying away from the Milky Way 67 kilometers per second faster for every additional megaparsec astronomers gaze out into space.But when astronomers look at actual galaxies, using delicate chains of inferences to make up for the universe’s frustrating lack of tick marks, they get a different number. Over the past few years, a team led by Nobel laureate Adam Riess from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, has cataloged standard candles: astrophysical objects with a known brightness, whose distance can be calculated based on how bright they appear from Earth. The team uses the supernovae explosions of white dwarf stars as standard beacons to measure distances far out into the swelling universe; they calibrate the brightness of nearby supernovae by monitoring variable stars, called cepheids, in the same galaxies. The stars’ light waxes and wanes at a rate that signals their intrinsic brightness. Earlier this year, this team, dubbed SH0ES, reported an H0 of about 74, a standard-bearing measurement for the astronomers’ side.If the discrepancy between the cosmologists and the astronomers can’t be chalked up to a subtle, hidden methodological flaw, modern physics itself could be due for a revision. Theorists, salivating at the possibility, have begun to dream up hidden ingredients in the early universe—new particles or interactions—that could patch over the gulf. But they haven’t found a fix that doesn’t cause new problems. With stakes that high, astronomers put their heads together in Santa Barbara to double and triple check the SH0ES result against other ways to measure the constant.A team called H0LiCOW relied on gravitational lenses, freak cosmic alignments where the light from a very distant, flickering beacon called a quasar is bent into multiple images on the sky by the gravity of another, intervening galaxy. Each image is formed by light traveling along a different path across expanding space. Because of that, though, the flickers don’t all arrive at Earth at the same time. Based on the time delays and not-so-simple geometry, the team calculated the H0 from six different such systems and came up with a value of roughly 73—“very close” to the SH0ES results, says Geoff Chih-Fan Chen, a team member at the University of California, Davis. The team didn’t check its final number—published just before the meeting on the preprint server arXiv—until the very end of its analysis to avoid bias, Chen says. “Some people will unconsciously want to get the right answer.”One point for possible new physics. But the meeting brought a twist. On the first evening, the Carnegie-Chicago Hubble Program team, led by Wendy Freedman, a veteran H0 measurer at the University of Chicago in Illinois, uploaded its own long-anticipated paper—already accepted to The Astrophysical Journal—to arXiv. Freedman’s team sought to develop a new type of standard candle. “If we put all our eggs in the cepheid basket,” Freedman says, “we will never uncover our unknown unknowns.”Instead, her team looked toward old, swollen stars called red giants. These stars have already exhausted the hydrogen fuel at their hearts, converting it to a core of helium that sits, inert, as a hydrogen shell around the core continues to burn. The star, seen from afar, grows brighter and brighter. But at a certain, predictable limit the temperature and pressure in the core grow high enough to burn helium, too, generating an explosive flash of energy that rearranges the interior of the star, ultimately causing it to begin to dim. By finding the very brightest red giants in a distant galaxy—the ones that toe this theoretical limit—the team could use them as standard candles to calculate distances and its own H0.One day after the paper appeared, Freedman presented the result to the meeting: a surprisingly low H0 of about 70. “It definitely felt like an album drop,” says Scolnic, a SH0ES team member. The value was stuck between the competing sides—and slightly favored the cosmologists. “It has caused at least some people to pause for a second, and say, ‘Well, maybe it’s not as clear cut,’” Freedman says. The SH0ES team had huddled together as soon as Freedman’s paper came out, and members were ready to question some of her team’s underlying premises after her talk. They also pointed to a trio of other, if less-precise, Hubble results debuted in Santa Barbara that rely on independent astrophysical concepts—clouds of water circling the centers of faraway galaxies, other kinds of variable stars, and the rate at which the luminosities of galaxies fall off from their center to their edge.A combined measurement that averaged all these astronomical results together still gave a value of 73. Unless hidden biases still lurk in the data, the gulf between that value and the cosmologists’ lower number remains near or above the 5σ statistical standard physicists use to divide possible flukes from the real deal.In Riess’s mind, at least, astronomers are nearing a consensus that the Hubble gulf highlights a true difference between the ancient and more recent universe. “You’re left with a problem, discrepancy, crisis,” Riess says. “The biggest argument at the meeting, I thought, was about what word to use.”His own vote? Crisis. By Joshua SokolJul. 19, 2019 , 2:50 PM ESA/Hubble & NASA last_img read more

Back burners

first_imgWoodland yoga It’s time to change into stylish yoga wardrobe for your workout sessions. Woodland has just launched their new yoga collection in various styles and colours (grey, teal, navy blue and black). Price starts at Rs 1,195. Available at all Woodland outlets. Taste treat Tucked away in the bylanes,Woodland yogaIt’s time to change into stylish yoga wardrobe for your workout sessions. Woodland has just launched their new yoga collection in various styles and colours (grey, teal, navy blue and black). Price starts at Rs 1,195. Available at all Woodland outlets.Taste treatTucked away in the bylanes of Dr. RK Salai, this place offers a variety of food, beverages and desserts.Go to: 6/29, Rajasekaren St, Mylapore, Dr. Radhakrishnan Salai. Meal for two: Rs 800 (plus taxes)Must try: FruitlettesTime machineThis watch will take you back in time. Based on the ancient time keeping technique-the Sun Dial, the watch has to be always aligned to the North so that it uses sunlight to indicate the time.Price: Rs 3,995Snip hubWanting a hair cut or a pampering facial? Head to the newly launched Allure Unisex Salon. It has been opened in collaboration with Schwarzkopf Professional at Nungambakkam. And, none other than Kollywood actor Suriya inaugurated the style shop.Happy feetCashing in on the soccer fever amongst sports enthusiasts in India, Lotto Sport Italia recently launched the new Zhero Gravity Ultra, the only laceless football boot in the world. The absence of laces ensures a perfect fit to the shape of the foot. It is available in white and metal blue colours. Grab it before FIFA ends.Cough up: Rs 9,999last_img read more

Adventure in the Alps

first_img“Your name is not registered in the list so I’m afraid you won’t be able to paraglide,” the guide tells me politely. I cannot believe what I am hearing. All my dreams of getting a bird’s eye view of the Swiss landscape and landing at Leysin village come crashing down. Standing at the height of 2,048m, on the Berneuse summit in the Lake Geneva region, I look around at the Alpine peaks like Eiger and Matterhorn, but nothing seems as charming as it did moments ago. I try to convince the guide that I have registered but it just does not work. This cannot be happening. I almost give up till an Israeli fellow traveller asks, “Have you done this before?” I shake my head despondently and then come his kind words, “All right, you can go in my place. I have done it before.” I can’t believe what I’m hearing and ask him if he is sure he wants to give up his turn. For me, Istramius is nothing short of an angel sent from heaven to fulfil my wish. I thank him profusely and soon my dream turns into reality.I am helped into the contraption, attached to a parachute, where a guide can sit behind me. I take a few steps, and up I go. Gliding high above houses nestled in green meadows and villages, with lofty peaks in the distance and the Lake Geneva that now seems a mere stream–it is an experience I’m going to take with me to my grave. Literally flying over the mountains is pure exhilaration and a great adrenalin rush. Initially I had thought it might be a bit scary, but the reassuring presence of the guide and the harness makes me feel quite safe. The guide even has a camera and captures the most beautiful moments of my trip.Fifteen minutes later I land in the middle of a lush pasture close to the cable car station at Leysin village and walk back to the hotel feeling absolutely content and happy. Leysin is popular for winter sports like skiing. It’s my last day in Switzerland and I have made the most of my time in the Alps. I love adventure sports, but have not had the opportunity to do much–this trip makes up for it. If someone had told me a few years ago that I’ll be hiking on a glacier in the Alps, I would have probably laughed out loud. But on the second day of my visit, I am all geared up for it and determined to do it. In fact when the tour leader tells me that my shoes may get wet, I promptly buy a pair of snow boots, not heeding the cost. Nothing can deter me from walking on the glacier at Jungfrau. This is the charm of this fascinating country–you do things which you thought are simply impossible.From Interlaken, we reach Jungfrau by a cog wheel train, which chugs alongside gurgling streams and green Alps that slowly turn white till all you can see around you is pristine snow and high peaks like Jungfrau, Eiger and Monch. Located at the height of 3,454m, Jungfraujoch is the highest rail station in Europe, and the temperature is -1 degree when we start our trek to MÅnchsjoch Hut, the world’s highest altitude mountain hut that offers meals. With the sun shining down, the weather is comfortable, but the 2.5 km hike along the clearly marked snow path seems endless. The breathtaking view of high peaks around me and spotting a few mountain climbers ahead keeps me going. My fellow travellers, who have completely different fitness levels, are way ahead of me, and it takes me longer than them to reach the hut. But the stunning view out there with high peaks all around is well worth the one-hour trek. After lunch, we make our way to a tunnel which leads to the ice palace, where everything, even the walls and floor is made of ice. After spending about half an hour here, we finally back to Interlaken via Grindelwald. Green pastures, charming houses, and of course the towering Swiss Alps in the backdrop makes this one of the most stunning villages I have ever seen. I sit with my jaw open, literally. Images of Yash Chopra movies immediately come to my mind–was this the road where SRK danced or was it that one, I wonder. Switzerland is impossibly pretty with its endless lush pastures, charming villages on the Alpine slopes. Sitting on a mountain with nothing but the sound of cow bells reaching my ears, I get one of my best moments in life.Don’t missLeysin is home to one of the three revolving restaurants in Switzerland. Located at the Berneuse summit, is Le Kuklos that gives a panoramic view of the peaks around. The restaurant revolves 360 degree within one hour and a half. Besides multi cuisines, it serves Swiss dishes as well. Have a meal at Fromagerie, located in the old part of Leysin. It is famous for its cheese fondue, raclette and great selection of Swiss wines. The cheese is homemade and tastes very different from something you may have eaten before.Check out Grand cafe restaurant Schuh in Interlaken for chocolate truffles and desserts.advertisementadvertisementlast_img read more

Dhoni says he is not 100% certain to play in 2015 World Cup

first_imgThe only second cricketer who led the country to a World Cup triumph, Mahendra Singh Dhoni says he is not 100 per cent sure of playing in the 2015 edition and will decide on it two years before the mega event.”If you see 2015, still three, three and a half years to go. I don’t really know where I will stand. Everything needs to go off well, and then by close to 2013, I will have to take a call whether I can really 100 per cent be available for the 2015 World Cup,” Dhoni said.”You don’t want a wicketkeeper in the side who has not played at least 100-odd games, at least close to 80-100 games, going into World Cup. So that’s a call that needs to be taken.But if everything goes off well, 2013 end will be time where we will have to carefully study the body and see what can be done,” said Dhoni.Dhoni has held aloft every cricket trophy in the world, from Twenty20 World Cup, IPL and Champions League T20 and to 50-over World Cup, and he said he would want to win the 2015 World Cup though he is not 100 per cent certain to play in it.”Well, why not do it all over again? If you don’t really have a dream, you can’t really push yourself, you don’t really know what the target is. It is important to stay focused, have short-term goals, not look too much in future, and try to win each and every series that is coming. Of course, you won’t be able to do that,” he said.advertisementAsked about his hero in life, Dhoni picked his team-mate and cricket icon Sachin Tendulkar and Bollywood superstar Amitabh Bachchan.”Well, that’s a very difficult one. There’s someone like Sachin Tendulkar, who is a part of the side, whom most of the individual cricketers look up to. And not to forget Amitabh Bachchan, who has been the biggest thing when it comes to Bollywood, and he is known the world over. So if you look at him, still, at his age, he is working, being among the best,” he said.”So these are the two people who are ideal role models, who have struggled through their phases in life and yet come out successful. The best thing is that they are very humble and grounded, which I think is very important to be a successful person,” Dhoni said.Dhoni said he was so emotional after winning the World Cup early this year that he wept after the summit clash along with his team-mates.”We all want to be part of a World Cup-winning side. The last time we won was 28 years back. So most of people (in the) side wanted to win the World Cup, and as soon as we got into a position where we saw World Cup coming into our dressing room, emotions started to flow. If you see, before the post-match presentation, almost every player cried,” he said.Asked if he also cried, he said, “Yes, I did. You don’t have footage of that. It’s very difficult to control emotion like that. I was controlling (myself). I wanted to quickly go up to dressing room, and I saw two players crying and running to me. All of a sudden, I started crying, and I looked up and there was a huddle around me. And each and every one cried.”About the pressure on Indian players to win the World Cup, Dhoni said, “I still remember playing the Australia quarter-final. People thought that was the biggest game when it came to the World Cup. Then it was Pakistan in the semi-final. I remember travelling and people were like, “Win this game and we don’t care about the finals.””As soon as we won the semi-final, it was like, “You have to win this because it doesn’t matter what you’ve done. If you don’t win the final it won’t be really nice.” So I think there was pressure, which was the ultimate thing,” he said.Dhoni said he loves to live in the present.”I love being in present. When I was playing for school, the only thing I wanted was get selected for U-16 or U-19 district teams. When I was selected for district I would think of next level, getting selected for state side. I’m a person who lives in the moment,” he said.last_img read more

Now watch cricket through umpires’ eyes

first_imgCricket enthusiasts would soon be able to enjoy the game through the umpires’ eyes.Specially designed sunglasses for umpires would now act as cameras and would be used on Wednesday (February 1) night at the Sydney Cricket Ground for Fox Sports coverage of the Big Bash Twenty20.The glasses are fitted with a micro high definition camera that is wired to a bigger battery, a transmitter and an aerial, which would be kept in a pouch on the umpire’s belt.The new sunglass cameras would allow the TV viewers get the best possible angle for LBW appeals and run outs.last_img

The Tortured Eleven

first_imgThe historic moment has arrived for a radical revolution in the rules of the game. There is no other option, if we want to protect hapless Indian masses from severe bouts of depression, leading directly to loss of national vigour and collapse of carefully nurtured pride. Cricket must now be played according to the laws of boxing.Compared to cricket, boxing is a humane and civilised sport. It knows when to stop. If the referee feels that a contest has become a one-sided exercise in hammering, and infers that while a boxer might remain technically on his feet but his brain has become softer than an election candidate’s morals, he arbitrarily stops a bout. By all norms of decency, the Australia-India series should have been halted. It is immoral to see eleven mature men, a fusion of superb spirit and individual brilliance, pummel a patchwork coalition of Dad’s Army and Mum’s Brats with ruthless ease and consistency. One of the significant successes of 20th century diplomacy was the Geneva Pact. It has banned torture. Why then does this callous world permit such unbridled torture on the cricket field? Why doesn’t the SPCA (Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Amateurs) intervene in such a humanitarian crisis?Purists will argue that India lost its way when Rahul Dravid dropped Mike Hussey at Melbourne in the first Test, and Australia recovered from 27 for 4 to an unbeatable 240 in the second innings. That sort of comment might, at best, fetch you a free coffee from naive friends. Wars are not lost because an officer dropped a flag. Every Indian journalist on tour has by now met the Australian taxi driver who asked the question, “What’s gone wrong with your team, mate?” That question misses the point as inevitably as Indian batsmen miss the ball. India does not have a team. It has half-a-dozen players who are punishing their ageing limbs in search of even more cash from an indefatigable lottery. Some batsmen are more anxious about the prospect of free land from chief ministers under the spurious excuse that they are setting up cricket academies, than about their next score. A heretical question is circling around even the finest we have seen: are you playing for Bharat or for the Bharat Ratna? The formidable patrician Dr W.G. Grace, whose beard was as long as his wit was sharp, once told an uppity bowler who had the temerity to get him out that the British spectator had come to see Grace bat, and an upstart bowl. He continued at the crease. We should now apply that useful principle to Sachin Tendulkar: let him get his 100th 100, and get on with stitching together a totally new team, including at least one 17-year-old who can become our next Sachin.advertisementPerhaps it is wrong to get harsh with Sachin Tendulkar, who still has runs to offer. Cricket is not a game you can play alone. But Sachin might yet want to recall what Vijay Merchant, the great Mumbai sportsman, once said: You should retire when the public still asks why, not when. But Merchant belonged to a generation when a Test player got one pound sterling as spending money per day on a foreign tour. Those players didn’t know how to spell a five-letter word called ‘crore’.Don’t get me wrong. There is nothing unethical about the wealth that now dominates the game. But money increases accountability. Indian cricket is, instead, controlled by a crony system in which administrators, selectors, players and their chosen commentators protect one another. Australia became invincible in my book on the day its captain Michael Clarke refused to cross Don Bradman’s score when he could have easily done so. That was not merely team before self; it was homage to Australia’s history, and a young genius telling us, with astonishing humility, that he would not break an implicit honour code.If there was a Border-Gavaskar trophy for alibis, however, Indians would have returned with heaps of silver. Gautam Gambhir’s throwaway accusation that the hosts had fixed the pitch was beneath contempt. Lose, but don’t cry. It was not defeat that shamed India, but the manner in which the side crumbled repeatedly. Of course the players never allowed their performance to affect their camera-perfect preening. These guys are professional. After all, they spend more time on television than soap opera stars. Even a newcomer grimaces with distaste at the umpire after having pitched four balls short and one full in a single over. Nothing is ever his fault. And he either already has or will soon get an advertising contract to prove it.advertisementThe majestic Dr Grace had some useful advice for fellow cricketers faced with columns such as this one. “Never read print, it spoils one’s eye for the ball.” If India’s present eleven had any eye left for the ball, there wouldn’t be such print either.last_img read more

Kings XI Punjab VS Rajasthan Royals: Punjab aim to keep winning

first_imgKings XI Punjab would look to continue their winning streak while Rajasthan Royals would be desperately looking for a change of fortunes after four successive defeats when they lock horns at the PCA Stadium on Saturday.Although Rajasthan beat Punjab by 31 runs in Jaipur on April 6, that was just the start of the tournament and the latter have improved a lot since then.Punjab are fresh from two consecutive victories against Indian Premier League (IPL) giants Mumbai Indians and Royal Challengers Bangalore, and have 10 points from as many matches. They have jumped to fourth place in the points table and are aiming for a win against Rajasthan in order to stay in contention for the play-offs.Rajasthan Royals, who started well in the tournament, have hit a rough patch and with eight points from 10 matches, are languishing in seventh spot after four successive losses.Punjab’s top order is their strongest aspect. Mandeep Singh, a 20-year-old right-handed batsman, is their highest run-getter with 277 runs in 10 matches. He is in form and can give Punjab a strong start with Shaun Marsh, who has 256 runs from nine matches.Skipper David Hussey is a reliable batsman in crisis situations. But Punjab’s problem is their middle order, which has not been consistent of late. Punjab are strong on the bowling front, which can help them seize the early momentum if they field first on Saturday. Seamer Praveen Kumar might not have taken a lot of wickets but he is a miser.Leg-spinner Piyush Chawla is Punjab’s most successful bowler with 12 wickets in 10 matches. He, along with seamers Parvinder Awana and Azhar Mahmood, can stifle the Rajasthan batting, which lacks consistency.advertisementOn the other hand, Rajatshan biggest drawback is their overdependence on their openers – skipper Rahul Dravid and Ajinkya Rahane, the highest run-getter.Dravid has been the most consistent player in the team with scores of at least 25 or above in his last seven matches. He forms a formidable opening partnership with Rahane, who smashed a superb 98 off 66 in Rajasthan’s win against Punjab last month.But once they are out, Rajasthan look like minnows. Shane Watson is yet to settle in. Owais Shah and Brad Hodge once looked great, but seem to have lost touch.Rajasthan’s biggest concern will be their bowling. Their joint highest wicket- taker Kevon Cooper has pulled out after an injury. Watson needs to step up with the ball.last_img read more

Border-Gavaskar Trophy: Test for India to hold on to home record win against Australia

first_imgTo kick-off what some call “probably the biggest series ever played”, Australia, cricket’s wandering bully-boys, made their opening remarks in a Mumbai disco. Called Insomnia. So do they expect to have a good time? Or a bad one?Stupid question, matey, because this is India. For no reason, the good times,To kick-off what some call “probably the biggest series ever played”, Australia, cricket’s wandering bully-boys, made their opening remarks in a Mumbai disco. Called Insomnia. So do they expect to have a good time? Or a bad one?Stupid question, matey, because this is India. For no reason, the good times can go bad and the bad times rendered rosy. Somewhere, somehow circumstances collide, a switch is thrown and everything changes. Like 2001. Remember it?Matt the bat does, a little mournfully, “Australia probably lost in about 10 minutes of that series. Ten minutes.” In 2001, Matthew Hayden found himself as a Test cricketer scoring 549 runs at 109.8 an innings in India and has not stopped since. “That was almost the perfect Test series,” he says.Almost. In the critical 10 minutes on the third day of the Kolkata Test, India up to their eyebrows in trouble, Rahul Dravid arrived and settled in with V.V.S. Laxman. A week later in Chennai, the series finished 2-1 to India. DVDs of the three Tests are sold under the title The Greatest Series Ever.Dravid on WarneMATCH-UP: Rampant Rahul Dravid (left) up against a fit Shane WarneClick here to EnlargeWarne is a great bowler and he has it all-variety, guile, accuracy and a big heart which is how he has taken 500 wickets. He has had his successes against me and I have had successes against him. To be considered his target is a back-handed compliment in some ways. He has had successes everywhere except in India and we will see how he goes. He had a lot of wickets in Sri Lanka but the conditions are different here.Dravid vs Australia: Tests 12 Runs 1313 Avg 57.09 100s 2 50s 7Warne on DravidI have enjoyed success against Rahul Dravid but I have always respected him. He has developed into a quality player since I first played against him. The main change that I have noticed in Rahul over the past few years is that he has realised how good a player he really is. He is the rock of the Indian batting line-up and at the moment he is on a roll. He is the man to get because all the others, all the stroke players, they bat around him.Warne vs India: Tests 11 Wkts 29 Avg 55.45 The Biggest Series Ever Played,The Greatest Series Ever; when India play Australia, the only sure thing, it seems, is hyperbolic hardsell-and the unpredictable. “In India momentum can switch like that,” Hayden snaps his fingers. “When it is gone, you can never get it back.”advertisementActually, don’t remember 2001 because it is gone too. India and Australia are older, stronger, er… balder and, it must be hoped, smarter. India, whimsical, watchable, seem to be Australia’s natural adversary.Not only were they World Cup finalists, but when they met last in a Test series on Australian soil 10 months ago, India didn’t go down under, squaring four Tests 1-1. Now Australia come ashore on a land where they have not won a Test series since 1969.Steve Waugh called India the Final Frontier. It remains unfinished business. With three tours in eight years, it seems they won’t leave India alone until the resistance breaks.In 2001, off-spinner Harbhajan Singh had provided the magic series taking 32 of 50 Australian wickets. In Kolkata, as India trailed by 276, Laxman’s 281 and a partnership of 376 with Dravid provided the miracle.But October will mark the end of all miracles. The Australians will take Harbhajan into account and factor in Laxman. However strong the temptation, captain Sourav Ganguly will not be dismissed in lazy cliche.Sachin Tendulkar, stricken by tennis elbow, may not be able to strike early blows. Besides, India is not unknown to the Aussies any more; most of the current players have toured here as juniors or seniors. “The mystique of India is not there any more,” says their coach John Buchanan. During the Champions Trophy they trained wearing three layers of clothing and woolly hats to get their bodies used to “Indian” degrees of heat. A yoga instructor, Kate Turner, has joined the touring party. They talk about stretching time and seizing the moment. In March, they swept three Tests in Sri Lanka, their most dominant Asian performance in a decade.The Indians were watching. “They are probably a better team than the one that came here last time, when they had a lot of batting first-timers,” says Indian vice-captain Dravid. “But since then we have developed as a side too.”Ten months ago when the Indians toured Australia, the openers blunted the new ball and gave the middle order a platform to succeed. “The Indians played better than we thought they would,” says pace-man Glenn McGrath, adding helpfully, “but those were batsmen-friendly wickets.” Pre-series jousting dictates that all compliments given with one hand must be of the kind that can be taken away with the other.In truth, Australia did little wrong in 2001. The flaws are probably noted down in some secret Not To Do list. They could not save the Kolkata Test, but after Sri Lanka, they think they have got that sorted. The Indian top six in Australia showed them the way, batting, in Justin Langer words, “like they were in a meditative state”.advertisementCONFIDENCE BUILDERS: Ricky Ponting’s men win in Sri LankaStand-in captain Adam Gilchrist looks inward, “Maybe we celebrated our success too early. We had won 16 Tests in a row and in Kolkata, India were following on and Sachin was out. We were on an absolute high.” Moral of the story? “You can’t get too far ahead of yourself,” he says. Buchanan agrees that the Australians might have wanted victory almost too much and that “it became a bit of a crusade for some players”. The Final Frontiersman probably wore everyone out.In 2004, they choose to open the verbals in India at a nightclub only because all other conference venues at their Mumbai hotel are taken. But it is clear the Aussies are trying a lower pitch. “It is an important tour,” says Gilchrist, “but not the be-allandend-all of our cricketing lives.” So just calm down everybody. If you can when you see a storm is coming.”You are talking it up too much,” says a deep, bass voice that is not known to register a higher decibel- unless, of course, Anil Kumble, for it is his voice, wants to appeal for lbw. Kumble hopes he will do so with success and frequency; he is only three Test wickets away from 400. Only one other Indian, Kapil Dev, has got this far. As the senior most bowler in world cricket, the Bangalore leg spinner has seen it all. Instead of the freaky chakra talk from the Australians, his series is surveyed in succinct bits and bytes. Enough runs on the board to give the bowlers a good crack. And no cheap shots about how taking wickets at home is no big deal.Saurav Ganguly holds off Australia at homeIn 2001, Kumble turned up at a pre-series camp in Chennai after a major surgery, his bowling arm in a sling. He stood in the sun and didn’t stop talking to a bunch of slow bowling rookies. Now, he will be the man to lead the bowlers, and Harbhajan, on the mend from surgery himself, is glad. “Nobody else has what we have-two good spinners bowling in tandem,” says the man whom the Aussies first nicknamed the Turbanator. “Australia has one great leg spinner in Shane Warne but not another one to play with him.”It is not just the Border-Gavaskar Trophy on the line but a home record stretching back 18 seasons in which India have lost only one full series. It is poetic justice for Kumble: every wicket he takes in October will not only be precious to his team but also take him, the much-mocked-spinner-who-cannot-spin-it, closer to becoming India’s most successful bowler ever. The world fears the ferocious Aussie batsmen. Kumble fears nothing, he merely knows what he must do. “They take more chances than anyone else. They like to take the initiative away from the bowler early, whether it is seamers or spinners.Runs on the board are important because they knock them off quickly. You have to think and bowl differently,” he says.Kumble’s art like the man himself has developed quietly-in Australia he became India’s main strike bowler when injury ruled Harbhajan out. In his most successful overseas series he picked up 24 wickets, variations in pace his key weapon. A line graph of his bowling speeds during the series looked like the ECG of a heart patient with palpitations. advertisementOddly enough, that could actually be a visual representation of the condition of the Indian batsmen. The same whose patience and discipline were borrowed by the Australians have struggled in one-day cricket all season. They have fallen victim to unexplained flashes of uncontrolled impulse.In the heat of the short game, the form and confidence from last season have melted away. The Indians will have to start all over-against the game’s most relentless team. Nothing like a little crisis to focus the mind.Ricky PontingSachin TendulkarBREAK IN PLAY: Aussie captain Ponting and Tendulkar may not feature in early action  As one of two crisis management specialists in the batting lineup, Laxman has a higher average against Australia than even Tendulkar and was part of three triple-century partnerships versus the world champs. A team that turns perfectly decent batsmen into bunnies has been forced to admit that no one makes them look more like pie-chuckers.Brett Lee has been quick in distributing a Waugh witticism to the world: “If you get Dravid, great. If you get Sachin, brilliant. If you get Laxman, it is a miracle.” Laxman said his thank yous but knows fast bowlers donot dish out compliments from the goodness of their hearts.The issue at hand is Indian form. “We haven’t transformed our starts this season,” says Laxman. “Hopefully we will compensate against Australia. Watch every ball and don’t think about who is bowling. Names don’t matter.” In a series like this, nor do reputations on either side.For all their success in Sri Lanka, Australia know that this is a different land, large and boisterous, each Test venue with its own rules set usually by eccentric curators.Wickets in India are neither as slow nor as variable as in Lanka and lend themselves to a sharper bounce and turn.Both camps know what to expect but knowing and preparing means nothing. All the positives from previous tours, from Sri Lanka, from wins over the Indians in one-day cricket will last, says Gilchrist, “only until the first ball is bowled in Bangalore”. Like Helmuth von Moltke, a 19th century Prussian general, once said, no plan survives contact with the enemy.SERIES STALWARTS: Opener Matthew Hayden and Harbhajan Singh (right)Plans may not work but mindsets do. One of Indian cricket’s forgotten men believes Australia demands a man to be “bull-headed”. Samir Dighe kept wickets in the deciding 2001 Chennai Test. As wickets toppled around him, he scored 22 to see India home. He chuckles at one memory: remarking loudly to new man Zaheer Khan that off spinner Colin Mille was looking bloody dangerous. Whether Dighe’s remarks had anything to do with Waugh’s decision to keep bowling Miller (who had taken two wickets) will not be known. But why leave anything to chance? In Miller’s next over, Dighe crashed two boundaries and the Indians inched closer to victory. Today Dighe does long hauls as a flight purser on Air-India and says, “The only way to win against the Aussies is not to be afraid of failure.”The contest has already seized the two teams: Australians are learning to do pranayam and Indians are trying to be cold-eyed. The two nations are not scheduled to meet again until 2007-8 and an Australian side is not likely to return to India before 2010. This is the last time two streams of skill and nerve will rush headlong into each other, a violent, churning rapid which will drown weak men.For one final time, as the world watches, Mc Grath will calibrate the air outside Dravid’s off-stump, two stoics going at each other in silent, bitter conflict. Hayden will wind up that massive log of a bat to try and sweep Kumble, who will be wearing his annoyed accountant’s face. Gillespie will give nothing to no one and Ganguly will let it all hang out.And, if the Gods are kinder still, a short, square man will do his quarter-squat, open up his stance and challenge the chubby pink-faced fella with spiky blond hair to bend that leg-break. India vs Australia is white-knuckle cricket. Insomnia has everything to do with it.last_img read more

A free hit for legendary cricketers’ dreams

first_imgSome of the legendary Indian cricketers who had either given up on many of their dreams or put on hold their pet projects can now fulfil their aspirations or complete their unfinished tasks. The handsome one-time benefit purse that the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) has announced for 157 Test and first-class players will help them tide over the situation.For instance, legendary big-hitting batsman Salim Durani can now expand his school in Jamnagar, Gujarat; former India captain Nari Contractor can go on the vacation that he had either been postponing or had completely given up on; 79-year-old Bapu Nadkarni feels the Rs 60 lakh that he would receive will help him see through the “rest of his life”. Legendary spin duo Bishan Singh Bedi and B.S. Chandrasekhar also expressed their happiness at the Board’s largesse.Contractor, who lives in Mumbai, feels that the real beneficiaries would be the children of the players of his generation.Contractor, 78, who will receive Rs 60 lakh for having played 31 Tests for India, hinted that he would spend much of the money on his grandchildren, who also live in Mumbai. “More than anything else, I ask [myself]: how many years of life do I have left in me? I get the BCCI monthly gratis and will now get Rs60 lakh. How do I spend this amount? It’ll definitely Rssettle’ our lives. But the real beneficiaries are the children of players who are being given this largesse. I have a son and a daughter and both of them have two children each,” Contractor, a left-handed batsman, told Mail Today. “Apart from all that, probably I can go on a holiday.”advertisementDurani, who is said to have hit sixes on public demand, will also receive Rs60 lakh for having played 29 Tests. The Jamnagarbased cricketer said that he would now expand the small school that he and his family run in his home city.”Several people in my family are in the teaching line, like my younger sister and a niece. They run a very small school in our ancestral house. We have decided to expand the school and construct a building, and start prep classes with the money that I received as part of the CK Nayudu Award last year (Rs13.50 lakh after deducting the tax) and now this amount,” Durani, now 77, told Mail Today.On being told that when Contractor made his Test debut in 1955 he got Rs 250 and when he left the scene in 1962 he received the same amount, Durani, in a lighter vein, said that the figure was slightly less. “He didn’t give you the correct picture. We used to get 40 annas less than Rs 250 per Test. When we used to go to ‘Mama’ (ND) Karmarkar, the then assistant secretary of the BCCI and a very jovial person, he used to ask jokingly if we had brought the revenue stamp of 40 annas,” he recalled. “And it is only then that we used to get the Rs 250 Test fee on the fifth and last day of a match.”Contractor pointed out that players had to use the Rs250 for their laundry, food, and coolie [porter] etc.And no equipment was available free of cost. So we could hardly save anything from the match fees,” he stressed. Left-arm spinner Nadkarni, who’ll receive Rs 60 lakh, disclosed that he had requested Sharad Pawar “to do something for former players”. “The BCCI monthly pension is very good, but the point is that you cannot survive only on that amount because of the high cost of living. When we retired, our limited income came to a halt,” he said.===Internship will benefit NIS coachesL. S. Ranawat, executive director, NIS, Patiala.For the first time in the 51-year history of India’s premier coaching school – the National Institute of Sports (NIS), Patiala – students who get admission in the diploma course in sports coaching for 2012-13 will undergo a compulsory eight-month internship. The course is of 10 months, starting July 1. Students will be paid a monthly stipend of Rs 10,000 during the internship.LS Ranawat, executive director at NIS, said that even the students who are passing out in 2011-12 session will have a two-month internship. “Last year too we had provided an internship opportunity, though we hadn’t announced it. Students passing out this session will have a two-month internship starting May 17. Each student will be paid Rs 10,000 per month, given two sets of kits, and their lodging will be free,” Ranawat told Mail Today. “From next year, we’ll provide an eight-month internship for the first time in NIS’s history.”advertisementVeteran coaches have welcomed the move by the Sports Authority of India, of which NIS is an important wing. “Previous students used to lose touch with what they had learnt at the NIS in the absence of coaching opportunities. Now, even if they don’t gets jobs they’ll get practical knowledge of coaching and earn some money too,” said one.===By announcing that the BCCI working committee has Rsapproved’ the participation of Pakistani national T20 champions, Sialkot Stallions, in the Champions League T20 in October, BCCI president N Srinivasan has sent people guessing vis-a-vis the resumption of India-Pakistan bilateral Test series.In 2004, too, when the series resumed after almost 15 years, it was preceded by junior level tournaments.Will the invitation be a precursor to resumption of the bilateral contests, or purely commercial reasons have prompted the decision?===Master spinner finds T20 a tough formatBapu Nadkarni keeps track of the Mumbai Indians.IPL is bowlers’ nightmare – well, most of the times – as the 20-over format provides undue advantages to batsmen. Bapu Nadkarni, who still holds the world records for bowling maximum successive maiden overs in an innings and a match, says even he would have found the Twenty20 format challenging. “Accuracy doesn’t help in T20; you need something more because batsmen play so many innovative, different shots,” the Mumbai-based Nadkarni told Mail Today. “It’s good fun [nonetheless].”The 79-year-old left-arm spinner, who played 41 Tests between 1955 and 1968, said he often watches the IPL matches. “I follow the Mumbai Indians,” informed the veteran who spends most of the time at home.Asked if youngsters, especially spinners, come to you to seek his advice, the Nadkarni deftly tackled the query. “Where do they have the time? Day in and day out they are playing,” he said, in a way defending the present-generation cricketers for not consulting him.After his Test career, Nadkarni served as a national team manager, his most memorable stint being India’s tour of Australia in 1980-81, when Sunil Gavaskar’s team staged a remarkable comeback to win the third and final Test in Melbourne to level the series 1-1. On that tour, Nadkarni was assistant manager to Shahid Ali Khan Durrani, who saved the potentially explosive situation in Melbourne when Gavaskar almost threatened to concede the match.last_img read more

Salinggawi gearing to bring back glory days

first_imgEthel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ NU extends win streak to 64, sweeps UE for 4th straight women’s hoops title MRT 7 on track for partial opening in 2021 Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim ‘A complete lie:’ Drilon refutes ‘blabbermouth’ Salo’s claims But it has since faired in and out of the podium with Salinggawi’s last championship happening back in 2006. Salinggawi hit a low point in 2013 when the famed group finished at seventh and the term “Sawinggawi” was infamously coined to mock the once formidable cheerdance institution.is current Salinggawi crop is not letting that 11-year drought taunt them.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games opening“We want to bring back the glory days of UST,” said Salinggawi team captain Benjo Gutierrez in Filipino after taking the silver medal of Season 80 Saturday at Mall of Asia Arena. “We want to become like the original Tigers who won five straight.”UST’s second-place finish was its second in three years, and although it’s still not the luster the Salinggawi is looking for, it’s a step back the right direction. Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next LATEST STORIES Malditas save PH from shutout Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. center_img Jordan delivers on promise: 2 Cobra choppers now in PH After 30 years, Johnlu Koa still doing ‘hard-to-make’ quality breads MOST READ Salinggawi Dance Troupe performs during the 2017 UAAP Cheerdance Competition at Mall of Asia Arena. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netThere was a time in the history of the UAAP cheerdance competition when the Salinggawi Dance Troupe of University of Santo Tomas would just show up and take the trophy.UST was the first dynasty of the exhibition after winning eight titles in the first 12 years of the competition. ADVERTISEMENT “We have to be passionate, trust the process, and trust ourselves,” said Gutierrez.And pushing the current Salinggawi is a former member turned rookie head coach Marc Chaiwalla who orchestrated UST to 638.50 points in his first UAAP competition.Gutierrez said it was Chaiwalla who pushed them past their limits and made them realize that they are capable of achieving more than what they initially thought of.“Our coach challenged us to be more fearless, to be bolder,” said Gutierrez. “He challenged us to exceed our expectations, he pushed us to newfound capabilities we never knew we could do.”“At first there was an adjustment period when he took over, a really long one, but we trusted the process rather than complaining,” said Gutierrez.ADVERTISEMENT Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games View comments The Fatted Calf and Ayutthaya: New restos worth the drive to Tagaytaylast_img read more

Castro returns, rescues Gilas Pilipinas in close win over Japan

first_imgEthel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ Missing six of its first eight shots, Gilas’ lackluster start saw the visitors run to a 20-4 lead before Ravena turned the tide and ignited a 17-2 blast to close the gap, 22-21, at the end of the first quarter.Rosario kept that flame burning in the second quarter as the Philippines staged a 20-4 run to grab a 41-26 lead. Makoto Hiejima and Ira Brown conspired to help the Japanese recover and pull within two, 43-41, before Rosario ended the first half with a booming triple for a 46-41 halftime edge.Blatche finally played true to form in the third frame, keeping Gilas in front before Castro and Calvin Abueva picked up the slack late and give the home team a 72-61 lead at the end of the period.Gilas Pilipinas faces Chinese Taipei in Taiwan on June 29, before seeking retribution against Australia at Philippine Arena on July 2 to wrap up the first round of the Asian qualifiers.Hiejima paced winless Japan (0-4) with 23 points, four rebounds, two assists, and two blocks, while Brown got 16 markers and eight boards.ADVERTISEMENT ‘A complete lie:’ Drilon refutes ‘blabbermouth’ Salo’s claims Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim The Filipinos rose to 3-1 in Group B of the first round of the qualifiers, sweeping Japan in their home-and-away series and clinched a spot in the second round.Blatche had his best outing to date in the World Cup qualifiers, finishing with 18 points, 16 rebounds, four assists, two steals, and a block in 30 minutes of play.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games openingTroy Rosario also had a triumphant return, firing 14 markers on 2-of-4 shooting from three and grabbing four boards, while Kiefer Ravena provided the spark 13 points, two rebounds, five assists and two steals.Castro, who returned to the lineup after missing the game against Australia due to an ankle sprain, had all of his eight markers in the second half. ‘We cannot afford to fail’ as SEA Games host – Duterte BeautyMNL open its first mall pop-up packed with freebies, discounts, and other exclusives View comments Photo by Tristan Tamayo/ INQUIRER.netJayson Castro made the game-sealing floater with 10.6 seconds left as Gilas Pilipinas bounced back with an 89-84 win over Japan Sunday in the 2019 Fiba World Cup Asian qualifiers at Mall of Asia Arena.The Philippines lost a 15-point lead but denied the visitors the upset behind Castro and Andray Blatche, who split his charities with 5.5 ticks remaining.ADVERTISEMENTcenter_img Judiciary Committee set to take over Trump impeachment probe MOST READ LATEST STORIES PH military to look into China’s possible security threat to power grid NU sustains dominance, beats UST SEA Games: PH still winless in netball after loss to Thais The Scores:PHILIPPINES 89 — Blatche 18, Rosario 14, Ravena 13, Abueva 8, Castro William 8, Norwood 8, Fajardo 7, Pogoy 6, Aguilar 5, Jalalon 2, Wright 0.JAPAN 84 — Hiejima 23, Brown 16, Tanaka 12, Shinoyama 9, Tsuji 8, Ota 6, Takeuchi 5, Uto 3, Harimoto 2, Furukawa 0, Hashimoto 0, Nagayoshi 0.Quarters: 21-22, 46-41, 72-61, 89-84.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Gameslast_img read more

Ind vs WI, 4th ODI: India beat West Indies by 59 runs

first_imgWest Indies won the toss and elected to field first against IndiaWelcome to the coverage of the 4th One-day International between India and West Indies from the Himachal Pradesh Cricket Association stadium in Dharamsala.ScorecardIt was a comfortable 59-run win for India, even though they let West Indies score freely after picking up early wickets. When West Indies were reduced to 121/5, it looked like India were quickly going to wrap things up, but Samuels and Russell hit some lusty blows to keep the game wide open. Samuels scored his 7th ODI hundred, but the Indian bowlers managed to get the breakthroughs at the fag end to dent the visitors. Well, it was announced initially that West Indies are calling off the remainder of the tour after this match, but they’ve made a U-turn, with their board denying any such claims. A decision is expected to be taken after the end of this match and at the moment, no one knows what is happening. We will get some clarity at the presentation. Toss: West Indies won the toss and elected to field first against India.Bolstered by their dramatic come-from-behind win in the last game, India will look to keep the winning momentum going when they meet West Indies in the fourth cricket one-dayer on Friday on what is expected to be a pacy track.The series is locked at 1-1 and the picturesque HPCA Stadium will provide the perfect setting as the two teams square off to seize the initiative before the final match of the series is played at Eden Gardens on October 20.advertisementIndia’s series-levelling victory at the Kotla was combination of West Indies’ self destruction while cruising towards an easy win and also inability to play on a track where there is some turn on offer.Spin duo of Ravindra Jadeja and Amit Mishra exploited the helpful conditions perfectly as West Indies lost eight wickets for 45 runs in their pursuit of a competitive total of 263.However, India might find it difficult for their spinners to extract same kind of help from the track here as they have done from 22-yard strip in Delhi.Notwithstanding the erratic display from the Caribbean batsmen, the battle in the backdrop of the Dhauladar mountain range should be exciting, considering the fast and bouncy nature of the pitch.There is always a chance of rain in the hills. Therefore even a light spell of shower will further aid the pacemen besides making the conditions colder.The teams chose to stay put in Delhi post the match on Oct 11 and arrived at a much-higher altitude here only on the eve of the match.Facing a decent West Indies pace attack on a lively surface will be a test for the Indian batsmen. The home team had a tough time batting first here against England in January 2013, when it lost half its men for 79 runs before going on to lose the match.The best thing to come out of the Kotla game for India is Virat Kohli hitting some sort of form after a prolonged lean patch.A gritty 62 on a typically low and slow Kotla wicket must have done his confidence a world of good. It also proved Mahendra Singh Dhoni’s decision to drop Kohli down the batting order at four behind Ambati Rayudu worked and the skipper is expected to stick to the same sequence.Chief curator Sunil Chauhan has promised the wicket will assist the fast bowlers and that might make either captain consider a four-pronged pace attack. In that scenario, leggie Amit Mishra could make way for Ishant Sharma.With pitch offering some bounce and lateral movement, Ishant’s hit-the-deck type of bowling might just be ideal for this kind of track.The World Cup not being far away and Ishant would like to throw his hat in the ring for being one of Dhoni’s trusted lieutenant in the pace bowling department when the marquee event starts in February next year.While the Indian pacers haven’t exactly set the stage on fire during the two ODIs, one man, who has surely impressed is Mohammed Shami.Shami, with eight wickets from two games, is now the highest wicket-taker in the series and by far looked the best pacer on view during the death overs with his consistent deliveries in the blockhole.Though young left-arm spinner Akshar Patel has been included in the squad for the last two ODIs, he is unlikely to make it to the playing XI as two left-arm spinners would make the attack one-dimensional.advertisementIt also seems rookie chinaman Kuldeep Yadav will have to wait longer for his international debut.Anyway, it will be a challenge for the Indian bowlers to contain the in-form Dwayne Smith and Marlon Samuels, who have been the stand-out performers with the willow, for the visitors.While Samuels hit an unbeaten 126 in the first game at Kochi that the West Indies won convincingly, Smith was guilty of throwing his wicket away at the cusp of century (97) in the second game in the Capital.Overall, it will be interesting to see how the unpredictable visitors bat on a tricky surface.On the bowling front, West indies skipper Dwayne Bravo would surely expect his fast bowlers to come to the party. He has the option of bringing in speedster Kemar Roach to support Ravi Rampaul and Jerome Taylor.Allrounder Andre Russell will be expected to keep things tight in the middle overs.Teams(from):India: MS Dhoni(c/wk), Shikhar Dhawan, Ajinkya Rahane, Virat Kohli, Ambati Rayudu, Suresh Raina, Ravindra Jadeja, Amit Mishra, Bhuvneshwar Kumar, Mohammed Shami, Mohit Sharma, Umesh Yadav, M Vijay, Kuldeep YadavWest Indies: Dwayne Bravo(c), Dwayne Smith, Lendl Simmons, Darren Bravo, Marlon Samuels, Leon Johnson, Darren Sammy, Kieron Pollard, Andre Russell, Denesh Ramdin(wk), Sulieman Benn, Jason Holder, Ravi Rampaul, Kemar Roach, Jerome Taylorlast_img read more

SRK, Priyanka to come together after three years

first_imgShah Rukh Khan and Priyanka Chopra will be seen together on screen almost after three years but this time not on 70mm but on small screen.Piggy Chops will be joining SRK to host TV show Got Talent World Stage Live which is scheduled to be held on December 6. The show wil be aired on Colors.SRK and Priyanka Chopra in a still from Don 2The duo were last seen together in Don 2 that was released in 2011. The last time Shah Rukh and Priyanka hosted an event together was in 2012 when they came together for the Zee Cine Awards.The show will being together 20 (10 Indian and 10 international) artistes from across the globe from countries like Britain, Australia, Spain, China, etc. who have already enthralled TV audiences with their performance on the Got Talent shows in their respective countries. The live event will be held  at the Andheri Sports Complex in Mumbai and later broadcasted on television.last_img read more

7 best dressed Bollywood divas at airport

first_imgFor Bollywood divas, travelling is synonymous with fashion. Theyhave to pass through the skeptic fashion scanner, even after a longdistance flight. Sporting comfy yet chic travel ensembles, these hotties sure know how to fly in style.We bring to you some of our favourite tinsel town beauties while they globe-trot. Kareena KapoorKareena is an avid globetrotter, thanks to her ever busy work schedule. She has mastered the art of emerging flawless after tedious long distanceflights. Her sans makeup look, coupled with black jeggings and bootsmakes her a style maven, and how.Begum of Pataudi tops the chart when it comes to perfect airport look. For full story and photos CLICK HERE>>She has mastered the art of emerging flawless after tedious long distance flightslast_img

Australia crush West Indies to win series 2-0

first_imgAustralia maintained their dominance over the West Indies with a crushing 277-run victory on the fourth day of the second test in Jamaica on Sunday to claim a 2-0 series win.They have not lost to the West Indies in 14 tests dating back to 2003, winning 11 and drawing three and the gulf between the sides looked wider than ever as the hosts were bowled out for 114 in their second innings.Australia, who won the first test in Dominica by nine wickets last week, outplayed their hosts in all departments. West Indies, were already in a hopeless position at the start of the day’s play and Australia ruthlessly wrapped up the win, taking eight wickets in 34 overs.Steve Smith was named man of the match after making 199 in the first innings, while right-arm fast bowler Josh Hazlewood was voted man of the series, he took 12 wickets at an average of 8.83.”The new ball is key on these types of wickets, there was always something there if you put the ball in the right areas, ” Hazlewood said at the victory presentation.Captain Michael Clarke had declared his side’s second innings late on Saturday to set West Indies a 392-run victory target with more than two days left. “What they’ve done really well is executed their skill over long periods of time, the whole attack,” Clarke said.”Our goal is to be more consistent away from home, so a really good start in these two test matches. We’ll enjoy tonight and then look forward to what’s ahead, ” he added. advertisementWest Indies resumed at 16 for two and lost five wickets in another feeble session for the addition of 56 runs before lunch.Shane Dowrich (4), Darren Bravo (11), Jermaine Blackwood (0), Shai Hope (16) and Jason Holder (1) all fell, though Denesh Ramdin (29) offered some resistance after lunch but Kemar Roach and Taylor were out in quick succession.The Australian attack shared the spoils, with Mitchell Starc claiming three wickets, while fellow quicks Hazlewood and Mitchell Johnson, and Lyon, collected two each and Medium-pacer Shane Watson chipped in with the other wicket.  The way Australia brushed past a West Indies side that drew a recent series with England will serve as a confidence booster ahead of the Ashes which starts in three weeks in Cardiff.last_img read more