Love him or hate him, Trump is right to wind down America’s endless wars

first_img Share But it happened, and continues to happen, as increasingly feeble excuses are now put forward by a Washington foreign policy elite which is desperate to avoid being held to account over the colossal failure of the America’s endless wars, lest the odium from them constrain the US from fighting wars of choice in the future.  The surface answer, parroted by the usual interventionist suspects in both parties, is that to fully leave would send America’s arch-foe the Taliban the signal that, without US support, the fragile regime in Kabul cannot militarily or politically stand on its own two feet and that the country could now be completely overrun by America’s enemies. This, of course, is entirely true.  Monday 23 November 2020 4:31 am John HulsmanDr John C. Hulsman is senior columnist at City A.M., a life member of the Council on Foreign Relations, and president of John C. Hulsman Enterprises. He can be reached for corporate speaking and private briefings at www.chartwellspeakers.com. by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeBetterBe20 Stunning Female AthletesBetterBeAll Things Auto | Search AdsNew Cadillac’s Finally On SaleAll Things Auto | Search AdsLuxury SUVs | Search AdsThese Cars Are So Loaded It’s Hard to Believe They’re So CheapLuxury SUVs | Search AdsGameday NewsMichael Oher Tells A Whole Different Story About ‘The Blind Side’Gameday NewsDrivepedia30+ Funny Photos Of Car Owners Having A Rough DayDrivepediaLiver Health1 Bite of This Melts Belly And Arm Fat (Take Before Bed)Liver HealthPost FunGreat Songs That Artists Are Now Embarrassed OfPost FunAtlantic MirrorA Kilimanjaro Discovery Has Proved This About The BibleAtlantic MirrorBrake For ItSay Goodbye: These Cars Will Be Discontinued In 2021Brake For It Main image credit: Getty But the interventionist blob wishes to stay on, as the obvious penalty for literally decades of foreign policy malpractice would be, with the victory of the Taliban, suddenly clear to the world’s public. Careers would be halted, blame rightly affixed — and, most importantly, wars of choice would be even further discredited with the American public than they already are (see the John C. Hulsman Enterprise’s/Public First poll on Americans’ reluctance to fight wars).  Trump has announced plans to cut troop sizes in Iraq and Afghanistan Also Read: Love him or hate him, Trump is right to wind down America’s endless wars This directly relates to today, and the frantic excuses the American foreign policy blob is pathetically throwing in the way of Donald Trump’s last-minute efforts to wind down the endless wars in Iraq and especially Afghanistan.  The American elite has been playing — and losing — at the roulette table of nation-building and fighting wars of choice for fully two decades. It is way past time for Dad to go home to Mom, admit his disastrous gambling addiction, and pay the piper for his recklessness.  Dad cannot go back to Mom telling her he has lost the kids’ college fund at the roulette table, so he keeps playing… and keeps losing. The reason for his demise — the terrible odds — is never analytically addressed.  I saw this doleful process up close and personal in Washington as the Iraq War slid toward the abyss. Very often those policymakers urging ever greater efforts there privately admitted to me that they did so largely to make good on their already monumental strategic losses.  But at this point, it is time for all of us to employ just a shred of logic in thinking this through. If, after spending an eye-watering $822bn–$1 trillion in Afghanistan over the last generation, a stable indigenous government does not have the magic elixir of local political legitimacy, it is a safe bet that it never will. The Kabul government is nothing other than a US puppet, and the country itself is merely a hideously expensive American colony.  What on its surface amounts to a minor troop withdrawal has caused a frenzy of denunciation from the foreign policy elite, which is itself operationally very odd. During the Obama administration, America had almost 100,000 troops in Afghanistan, yet still could not manage to defeat the Taliban. What does it matter now if the US has 4,500 troops there or 2,500? After peremptorily firing defence secretary Mike Esper, a bitter-ender who wants to keep American troops in both Afghanistan and Iraq indefinitely, Trump has announced plans to cut troop sizes in both to merely 2,500 by January 15, 2021 — this is down from the 4,500 soldiers presently stationed in Afghanistan and the 3,000 in Iraq — just five days before the inauguration of Joe Biden.  I pointed out that emotionally doubling down on a bad strategic assessment in order to wipe the slate clean of one’s intellectual mistakes — saving career and reputation — is a terrible way to make foreign policy.  City A.M.’s opinion pages are a place for thought-provoking views and debate. These views are not necessarily shared by City A.M. whatsapp Trump has announced plans to cut troop sizes in Iraq and Afghanistan Opinion As this is so obvious, the strategic options are clear and binary: either the US is determined to properly colonize the place, staying forever, or it is past time to go and cut its massive, tragic losses of both blood and treasure. This is especially true now that, in direct talks with the Taliban, America’s enemies have agreed (on pain of being re-invaded) to not harbour terrorists inimical to US interests — the only strategic reason for the intervention in the first place.  whatsapp Trump has announced plans to cut troop sizes in Iraq and Afghanistan Also Read: Love him or hate him, Trump is right to wind down America’s endless wars Get City A.M. columnists’ views delivered straight to your inbox in our daily Midday Update newsletter. In my last book, To Dare More Boldly: The Audacious Story of Political Risk, each chapter represents a key precept, based on a specific historical story, as to how to do political risk analysis right.  More From Our Partners Kansas coach fired for using N-word toward Black playerthegrio.comRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgMan on bail for murder arrested after pet tiger escapes Houston homethegrio.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgFort Bragg soldier accused of killing another servicewoman over exthegrio.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgFans call out hypocrisy as Tebow returns to NFL while Kaepernick is still outthegrio.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.org One of my favourite of these 10 commandments is what I term “the Losing Gambler’s Syndrome”. As regular readers of this column well know, I am incandescent with rage at the puerile post-electoral temper tantrum to which President Trump is subjecting us all, nakedly putting his own interests — as so many of us feared — ahead of the interests of both the American Republic and its people. But, in keeping faith with his Jacksonian base over his promise to wind down the forever wars, Trump is actually performing a public service, even if his motivation is also revenge at the Washington establishment that so loathed him.  Love him or hate him, Trump is right to wind down America’s endless wars The Losing Gambler Syndrome is a fact of the human condition that casino magnates have come to well understand. When someone loses big at the tables, they have an overwhelming urge to invest ever more resources to make good on their catastrophic losses, rarely bothering to think about the reasons for these losses in the first place.  Show Comments ▼last_img read more

Charity begins at home — which makes foreign aid more important than ever

first_imgWe should be realistic: aid will always be finite, so let us spend it where it benefits the recipients and the donors alike. Strengthening failed or failing states makes the world safer for us. There is no shame in admitting that, and pursuing it. Aid is in part conflict prevention: let us sing it from the rooftops. We also need to change the kind of aid we give. The story of the fish versus the teaching-to-fish is a chestnut so hoary it requires carbon dating, but it has a kernel of enduring truth. Some 64 per cent of our aid budget goes on bilateral projects (of which, somewhat troublingly given its global stance, Pakistan is by far the largest recipient), and these are often “fish” rather than “fishing lessons”. Many of the countries we help are not short of human capital or entrepreneurial spirit. Opinion Eliot WilsonEliot Wilson is co-founder of Pivot Point and a former House of Commons official. We talk about the influence of soft power and the reputation of the UK abroad resting as an “international development superpower”, but what does it mean in practice? What is the purpose?  But more important than the exact numbers is a rethink of how we give aid. The entire question has become needlessly political, with those on the left guilt-tripping us for not spending more, and voices on the populist right insisting that “charity begins at home” and “India has a space programme, you know”. The Archbishop of Canterbury described the decision as “shameful and wrong” (as a former oil executive he perhaps has some experience of this), while Sir John Major and Tony Blair (their combined tenure as Prime Minister totalling 17 years, during none of which was a statutory target set) have also weighed in. Look at the extraordinary explosion of enterprise in east Africa over the last 10 years, with new businesses springing up in Uganda, Kenya, Botswana and others. What these economies need is access to capital, the wherewithal to fund new technology and infrastructure, and better banking systems. Investment here is potentially transformative: rather than alleviating poverty by giving out aid, we could help resilient populations grow their way out of that poverty, and achieve sustainable growth on their own terms. whatsapp Thursday 26 November 2020 5:35 am No one can have envied Rishi Sunak yesterday, for it was the chancellor’s task to unveil the Spending Review to the House of Commons, facing (we were told by the Treasury) the worst economic landscape since the Great Frost of 1709.  The reality — which may be unpalatable for both camps to acknowledge — is that Britain stands to gain an awful lot from foreign aid, if it is targeted properly. The British have a genius for capital. We were among the pioneers of promissory notes, we created the model for central banking, and we gave birth to some of the greatest joint-stock companies of the mercantile age. Now, with our backs to the economic wall, we need to channel that spirit to the rest of the world.  Britain could help resilient populations grow their way out of that poverty Also Read: Charity begins at home — which makes foreign aid more important than ever whatsapp Sunak strove for sombre and minatory, but he has not yet gained enough political weight for that. Nevertheless, the message was clear. A hard rain’s a-gonna fall. Main image credit: Gettycenter_img Britain could help resilient populations grow their way out of that poverty This was a trophy promise of the Cameron government. It was enshrined in the International Development (Official Development Assistance Target) Act 2015, but that particular piece of legislation has not aged well. Expect an amending bill to hit parliament soon, reducing the figure to 0.5 per cent and saving £4bn in the process. Perhaps it is time for a gust of the fresh air of reality. In 2021, the UK will spend £10bn instead of £14bn on overseas aid, and will fall from the highest to the second highest spender in the G7, slipping behind Germany.  Charity begins at home — which makes foreign aid more important than ever The outcry has come from the development community, of course, and also the political establishment. Liz Sugg, an unobjectionable and worthy Cameroon who found herself a baroness and a minister, has quit her role at the Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office in protest.  The government talks a great deal of its “levelling-up agenda” between different parts of the United Kingdom: why can’t we set our sights higher, and try to level up the world? City A.M.’s opinion pages are a place for thought-provoking views and debate. These views are not necessarily shared by City A.M. Show Comments ▼ Britain could help resilient populations grow their way out of that poverty Also Read: Charity begins at home — which makes foreign aid more important than ever This is not an abandonment of the “global Britain” tag, and it is hardly a cause for us to hang our heads and rend our clothing. If we are “reduced” to this in the worst economic conditions for 300 years, then perhaps we are doing rather well. More From Our Partners ‘Neighbor from hell’ faces new charges after scaring off home buyersnypost.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgMatt Gaetz swindled by ‘malicious actors’ in $155K boat sale boondogglenypost.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgWhy people are finding dryer sheets in their mailboxesnypost.comSupermodel Anne Vyalitsyna claims income drop, pushes for child supportnypost.comKamala Harris keeps list of reporters who don’t ‘understand’ her: reportnypost.comInside Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis’ not-so-average farmhouse estatenypost.comUK teen died on school trip after teachers allegedly refused her pleasnypost.comI blew off Adam Sandler 22 years ago — and it’s my biggest regretnypost.comConnecticut man dies after crashing Harley into live bearnypost.comBiden received funds from top Russia lobbyist before Nord Stream 2 giveawaynypost.com980-foot skyscraper sways in China, prompting panic and evacuationsnypost.com It must surely be more than pure altruism — important and admirable though that is. If we as a nation are spending tens of billions on something, one does not have to be blinded by realpolitik to expect some return. One of his announcements which caused consternation in the governing classes was the abandonment of the commitment to spend 0.7 per cent of GDP on international aid.  Sharelast_img read more

Brexit: EU launches crackdown on ‘desk mapping’ in the City

first_img Bankers are unimpressed by the prospect of leaving London, with some quitting rather than leaving the UK. Share The primary objective is to reduce the number of EU-based clients that are solely or predominantly served by units and teams in the City and Canary Wharf, All 27 EU member states have to sign off on the Memorandum of Understanding, with this process reportedly yet to begin. Brexit: ECB to crack down on ‘desk mapping’ in London to drive more bankers and capital to the EU Bankers are unimpressed by the prospect of leaving London, with some quitting rather than leaving the UK. Also Read: Brexit: ECB to crack down on ‘desk mapping’ in London to drive more bankers and capital to the EU Tags: Brexit Most of these banks have continued serving their EU-based clients from their large offices in London. Moreover, restrictions in movement on both sides of the Channel, as a result of the pandemic, complicated any further job moves and relocation plans. Show Comments ▼ whatsapp JP Morgan, Citi and Goldman Sachs The bank believes that currently, too many bank rely too heavily on their London units while serving clients across the EU, thereby escaping regulatory scrutiny and oversight, according to a Bloomberg report, citing anonymous sources to the ECB. More From Our Partners A ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comWhy people are finding dryer sheets in their mailboxesnypost.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgInside Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis’ not-so-average farmhouse estatenypost.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgMark Eaton, former NBA All-Star, dead at 64nypost.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgBiden received funds from top Russia lobbyist before Nord Stream 2 giveawaynypost.comUK teen died on school trip after teachers allegedly refused her pleasnypost.comMatt Gaetz swindled by ‘malicious actors’ in $155K boat sale boondogglenypost.com‘Neighbor from hell’ faces new charges after scaring off home buyersnypost.comFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comBill Gates reportedly hoped Jeffrey Epstein would help him win a Nobelnypost.comConnecticut man dies after crashing Harley into live bearnypost.com980-foot skyscraper sways in China, prompting panic and evacuationsnypost.comKiller drone ‘hunted down a human target’ without being told tonypost.com Since the 2016 referendum, banks have reluctantly moved some jobs and operations out of London, primarily to Paris, Dublin, Frankfurt and Amsterdam. The ECB is specifically targeting JP Morgan, Goldman Sachs, Citibank, Morgan Stanley and other U.S. investment banks, several European media report today. “The desk-mapping exercise is at an early stage and still ongoing. Thus the ECB has not yet given feedback to individual banks on its outcome,” an ECB spokeswoman reportedly said. For international banks wanting to do business in the EU post-Brexit, the use of blank typos would reportedly no longer be allowed. center_img The agreement will outline how financial services regulators in the UK and EU will maintain open lines of communication when making decisions, but will stop short of giving City of London firms renewed access to EU markets. Despite the noise, the modest number of relocations have, so far, not threatened London’s status as a global financial powerhouse. Still no financial services deal The ECB’s move comes only weeks after news that France is working to block a post-Brexit financial services pact between the UK and the EU over the ongoing row about fishing rights. The issue blew up earlier this month when more than 60 French fishing boats created a blockade around the island of Jersey, leading Boris Johnson to send two Royal Navy gunboats to patrol the protest. French president Emmanuel Macron sent his own naval ships in retaliation. Bankers are unimpressed by the prospect of leaving London, with some quitting rather than leaving the UK. Also Read: Brexit: ECB to crack down on ‘desk mapping’ in London to drive more bankers and capital to the EU The central banking authority plans to scrutinise and crack down on so-called ‘desk mapping’ – or ‘back-to-back booking’ – to determine whether banks’ key staff, capital and book trades used by EU-based clients are not based outside the bloc. Bankers are unimpressed by the prospect of leaving London, with some quitting rather than leaving the UK. Also Read: Brexit: ECB to crack down on ‘desk mapping’ in London to drive more bankers and capital to the EU The UK and EU announced in March that it had drafted a regulatory co-operation agreement, known as a Memorandum of Understanding, on financial services, however it is yet to be signed or made official. The ECB, however, has told banks it will no longer allow the ongoing pandemic as an excuse to delay post-Brexit implementation plans. Thursday 27 May 2021 4:54 pm French officials, however are reportedly trying to stall the signing of the Memorandum of Understanding due to the country’s fishermen finding it difficult to get fishing permits for British waters. Bankers are unimpressed by the prospect of leaving London, with some quitting rather than leaving the UK. Also Read: Brexit: ECB to crack down on ‘desk mapping’ in London to drive more bankers and capital to the EU whatsapp Bankers are unimpressed by the prospect of leaving London, with some quitting rather than leaving the UK. Also Read: Brexit: ECB to crack down on ‘desk mapping’ in London to drive more bankers and capital to the EU The European Central Bank is ramping up efforts to push more management and capital out of the City and Canary Wharf, into the EU. Michiel Willems last_img read more

DNA shows Eagle River bears killed were not to blame for attacks

first_imgPublic Safety | Southcentral | WildlifeDNA shows Eagle River bears killed were not to blame for attacksJuly 20, 2018 by Casey Grove, Alaska Public Media Share:Three bears shot and killed in Eagle River are not the bears responsible for recent maulings, including a fatal attack, the Department of Fish and Game announced Thursday.The bears’ DNA did not match evidence at the scene of the June maulings near the end of Hiland Road, Fish and Game spokesman Ken Marsh said.The bear blamed for the attacks remains on the loose.Marsh said it was a sow brown bear that had attacked and killed Michael Soltis, 44, who lived in the area and was out for a hike.Soltis was reported missing, and police said the bear was apparently guarding his body.Two days later, the sow attacked another a man, who was in a search party looking for Soltis. The man survived.Efforts to trap or find the bear have been ongoing since then.Marsh said department personnel shot a sow bear and two yearling cubs on Friday near where Soltis’s body had been discovered roughly three weeks after the attacks.But DNA tests showed the sow bear did not attack either of the men.Share this story:last_img read more

Online sales taxes could encourage Alaskans to shop local

first_imgBusiness | Economy | Local GovernmentOnline sales taxes could encourage Alaskans to shop localJuly 25, 2018 by Aaron Bolton, KBBI-Homer Share:Shops line Pioneer Avenue in Homer (Photo by Aaron Bolton/KBBI)The U.S. Supreme Court changed course on taxing online sales this summer.The Kenai Peninsula Borough currently seeks to tax major online retailers, namely Amazon.While taxing those sales may help cash-strapped boroughs like the Kenai Peninsula, local retailers hope the change will benefit their bottom line.In June, the Supreme Court overturned a 1992 decision preventing states and municipalities from taxing online retailers without a presence in their jurisdiction.States and communities that are not home to warehouses, stores or offices belonging to major online retailers can now tax their sales.Kenai Peninsula Borough wants to tax most online purchases, and the Assembly likely will take up the issue this fall with the aim is to target consumers like Homer resident Danielle Meyers.“I was born and raised in Alaska. So, I’ve resorted to online shopping most of my life,” Meyers said as her one-year-son sat on her lap at the kitchen table. “It has varied, but now as a mother, most of my online shopping is through Amazon.”Meyers and her husband mostly buy household items like cleaning supplies, diapers and wipes through Amazon’s subscribe and save program.“I even get my quinoa and my rice through that program,” she said.Meyers would be happy to pay into the borough’s coffers through her online purchases, but local brick-and-mortar retailers hope taxing online sales will incentivize consumers like her to shop locally instead.“I’m not sure how sensitive people are to the sales tax in the Homer area, especially with a $500 cap. The maximum impact on any transaction is $37.50,” said Patrick Mede, co-owner of Ulmer’s Hardware Store, which sells everything from firearms to gardening supplies. “Theoretically, you should see some change. How much of a change will it be for our business? I’d be interested to see. I don’t know.”Having managed the store for the past two years, Mede said it’s difficult to determine how much business he loses to online retailers overall, but he said the largest impact he has seen is on high-end sporting goods like fishing rods and skis.“People do more research online and they’re more apt to buy those online where they can get a deeper discount than here,” Mede said. “Lower value items, items that they need immediately, we see much less decrease in sales due to online sales — at least we think so.”How online shoppers’ habits might change as a result of online sales taxes is hard to say.There are more factors than just price, according to Mouhcine Guettabi, associate professor of economics at the Institute of Social and Economic Research.“There’s the big question of are people actually buying the same things they would otherwise buy in their community online or not,” Guettabi said.There isn’t a lot of data on what Alaskans are buying online and how many of those products are available in the communities they live in.When it comes down to the fundamental question of whether consumers will be more apt to buy items from local retailers because of a sales tax, Guettabi said that still largely will depend on the base price of the product, though he does acknowledge taxes make a difference.“When, for example, a community across the border from a state levies a tax, we do see people crossing the border to buy things that are not taxed,” Guettabi said.On high-priced items like a fishing rod, the Kenai Peninsula Borough and Homer’s combined 7.5 percent sales tax might not be enough to close the gap between what consumers pay online and locally.It might make a difference on items such as paper towels and cleaning supplies purchased from Amazon, where savings can vary and some items are actually more expensive.But consumers like Meyers said she is still saving money.“It’s still cost effective for me to keep shopping this way,” Meyers said. “I don’t think it will change the way that I shop online at all.”Meyers adds that all those savings are delivered to her front door, providing a convenience with which local retailers may not be able to compete.Share this story:last_img read more

Kodiak biologists track climate variation’s impact on berries, bears

first_imgEnvironment | Outdoors | Southwest | Tourism | WildlifeKodiak biologists track climate variation’s impact on berries, bearsAugust 17, 2018 by Daysha Eaton, KMXT-Kodiak Share:A Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge crew surveys blueberries at Abercrombie State Park in Kodiak. (Photo by Daysha Eaton/KMXT)Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge biologists just wrapped up this season’s field work monitoring berry supply in relation to the health of bear populations.They’ve been assessing berry patches and doing aerial surveys for bears.The surveys lay the groundwork to create a baseline from which to measure how climate change and other factors may be affecting this particular aspect of Kodiak’s bear foraging habitat.Audio Playerhttp://kmxt.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/Berry-Survey-KMXT-Aug-16.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.“We come back about the same time each year to sample the abundance of blueberry and devil’s club,” said Bill Pyle, the supervisory wildlife biologist with Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge.Pyle walks a trail in Abercrombie State Park where he is leading a team surveying for an abundance of blueberries. They’ve already surveyed for salmonberry and elderberry.“It is much better than it was last year where we had conditions during the winter that knocked out the production, and there wasn’t really any berries to be had for people and wildlife,” Pyle said.Last year was a terrible year for berries.On the north and west side of the island, there was virtually no production of three of the four species: salmonberry, elderberry, and blueberry.Devil’s club was the one exception.Biologists still don’t know exactly how it impacted bears and other animals here, but they are hoping to find out. Pyle said low snow cover left shrubs unprotected from the cold and exposed to browsing deer.Vaccinium ovalifolium, or Oval-leaf Blueberry. (Photo by Daysha Eaton/KMXT)Berries are a critical food source for bears and help them put on fat for winter.The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has been doing the surveys for the past four years as part of a long-term look at climate variations’ effects on bears and bear habitat. They modeled their survey after another in the Rocky Mountains.In the short term, they’re trying to sort out how much last season’s low berry production affected the island’s iconic bears.Pyle and his crew divert from the path, arriving at a vast patch of the 5- to 8-foot shrubs above a pond and under a canopy of tall Sitka Spruce. The bushes are loaded.Vaccinium ovalifolium, or oval-leaf blueberry, is not superabundant on Kodiak and, biologists say that like Sitka spruce it is still in the process of colonizing the archipelago.This work requires sturdy boots and some bushwhacking.Crew member Danny Hernandez stretches a long measuring tape from a metal stake in the ground to another one up the hill.“We are going to sample blueberries along, and this is going to go out 50 meters,” said Hernandez. “And we are going to sample a 20-by-20-centimeter quadrant of blueberries at every half-meter interval and count up the berries and estimate the blueberry leaf cover that is in that frame and get an estimate how much blueberry is here.”Catie Thow is a volunteer on the project.“I’d traveled in Alaska before, and I just always really wanted to come back and especially in Kodiak, which is such an amazing place and, you know, it’s always famous for the Kodiak brown bear. And I heard Bill was looking for volunteers to sample bear habitat, so I figured I’d just get involved.”Hernandez and Thow work together along the transect counting and measuring while Pyle writes down the data.It is painstaking work, but once all the numbers are in, they’ll paint a picture about what is happening for bears and bear habitat on the island which hasn’t been available before and which may become even more important to understand as the climate changes.Pyle says they just completed their final survey of devil’s club berry clusters.Next, they’ll take the berry data and do some complicated math comparing it with the data gathered from bear surveys.Pyle acknowledges there’s another species whose survival doesn’t necessarily depend on the berries, but that could benefit from the surveys: humans.The study, Pyle adds, may also have value for local subsistence users and hunters.As well as for the tourism industry, which, on Kodiak, is deeply connected to the health of the bear population.Share this story:last_img read more

Snowmaking improvements and beer and wine sales in store for Eaglecrest this season

first_imgJuneau | OutdoorsSnowmaking improvements and beer and wine sales in store for Eaglecrest this seasonOctober 11, 2018 by Adelyn Baxter, KTOO Share:Eaglecrest Ski Area bought six new snowmaking machines this year to expand their snowmaking operations. (Photo by Adelyn Baxter/KTOO)Summer and fall may be the off-season for Eaglecrest Ski Area, but things have still been busy for Juneau’s municipal ski area since the snow melted.Audio Playerhttps://media.ktoo.org/2018/10/11eaglecrest.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.With the first snow appearing on top of the mountains, Juneau residents are starting to wonder what kind of winter it will be on the ski slopes.The same goes for Eaglecrest General Manager Dave Scanlan and his staff.They’ve been busy this off-season, and they can’t wait to see the crowds return to the mountain.“Oh gosh, we’re just excited to be getting all these projects done and just having another great season under our belt,” he said.Last year, after a snowy November, record temperatures in December and January and little precipitation in the beginning of February meant parts of the mountain didn’t open until almost March. There just wasn’t enough snow.So Scanlan and his team have spent the last few months revamping the mountain’s snowmaking operation.Eaglecrest relies on a gravity water pumping system fed by Cropley Lake, about two-thirds of the way up the west side of the mountain.“We could make snow really good in the base area but we couldn’t connect the dots to where the natural snow base was deeper, you know, during warm weather,” he said.Now, a new water pumping station and pipeline will provide the pressure needed to make snow on the mountain’s midsection.“We’ve been making incredibly fast progress on the project up to date,” Scanlan said. “So, very confident we’re going to see that pipeline completed to the top of Hooter, we’re going to see that pump station come online this year.”Scanlan said they hope to be able to extend the pipe to the base of the Black Bear Chair, too, before the start of the season.They also bought six used snowmaking machines to expand their snowmaking abilities.“We’ve got 10 guns in the fleet now, so really excited to also have that ability to move machines around faster, to be more mobile.”Mechanical problems with the Black Bear Chair last year also kept the east side of the mountain closed for most of the season.The solution is a new 250-kilowatt generator installed for Black Bear. Scanlan said they’re hooking up the wiring this week.“It will also give us the versatility to power up our snow guns when we’re making snow at the bottom of Black Bear.”Other new features this winter include a new ramp for the Ptarmigan Chair at the top of the mountain, a new entrance to the lower Nordic trails and, if all goes according to plan, beer and wine sales in the lodge for the first time ever.The Juneau Assembly approved this new venture last year.Scanlan said they’re finishing up the permitting stage now. They will need final permit approval from the Assembly in November.They’re still renovating the new bar space and have a vendor lined up.“It’s a third-party concessionaire agreement. Louie’s Douglas Inn is our vendor, so really excited with the Douglas Island connection.”As for the snow outlook, that’s anyone’s guess right now.Scanlan said a potential El Nino influence could bode well for upper mountain snowpack. The mountain saw its first dusting of snow at higher elevations last week.“We’ll see how it goes,” he said. “I’ve also heard from longtime locals that following hot, sunny summers have been very snowy winters. So we’ll see if that connects up as far as some of the historical trends. Always keep the optimism up.”Eaglecrest’s target opening this year is the first weekend in December.In the meantime, the Juneau Ski Club’s annual Ski Sale will be Nov. 3 at Centennial Hall.Eaglecrest will have a table there offering gear tune-ups and season passes. The deadline to purchase a season pass at the cheaper Tier 1 pricing is Sunday.Share this story:last_img read more

Labour leadership race: “Ukip”, “immigratation” and “SNP” due to dominate debate

first_imgTuesday 16 June 2015 9:41 am whatsapp ashley.kirk Labour leadership race: “Ukip”, “immigratation” and “SNP” due to dominate debate Show Comments ▼ by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeMoneyPailShe Was A Star, Now She Works In ScottsdaleMoneyPailInvestment GuruRemember Cote De Pablo? Take A Deep Breath Before You See Her NowInvestment GuruPost FunKate & Meghan Are Very Different Mothers, These Photos Prove ItPost FunMaternity WeekA Letter From The Devil Written By A Possessed Nun In 1676 Has Been TranslatedMaternity WeekForbesThese 10 Colleges Have Produced The Most Billionaire AlumniForbesComedyAbandoned Submarines Floating Around the WorldComedyTotal Battle – Tactical Game OnlineThe Most Addictive Strategy Game of 2021Total Battle – Tactical Game OnlineEliteSinglesThe Dating Site for Highly-Educated Singles in ScottsdaleEliteSingleszenherald.comMeghan Markle Changed This Major Detail On Archies Birth Certificatezenherald.com Tags: Labour leadership racecenter_img Share whatsapp The SNP, Ukip and immigration are likely to dominate the first Labour leadership debate, according to the betting company Ladbrokes. In the race to become the next Labour leader, Andy Burnham, Yvette Cooper, Liz Kendall and Jeremy Corbyn will go head to head in a debate hosted by the BBC on Wednesday. Ladbrokes is taking bets on the most likely buzzwords to feature in the debate – with Ukip and the SNP featuring highly. Ukip has odds of 1/10 in featuring, while the SNP and immigration are each on 1/5 odds, showing how the problems of the 2015 General Election are looming over the party’s future.Read more: Sadiq Khan: “Aspiration” will be overused in Labour leadership raceTony Blair is also likely to haunt the party’s discourse, with odds of 1/2 on featuring. On even odds are the phrases “connect with the voters”, “on the doorstep” and “exit polls” – all of which hark back to Labour’s unsuccessful General Election campaign where it sunk to its lowest level in three decades. Other phrases that could feature in the debate are “Edstone” (2/1 odds), “we spent too much” (5/1 odds) and “terrible leader” (10/1 odds).The first debate between the candidates will be hosted by the BBC on 17 June. It will be moderated by Laura Kuenssberg and will be shown on Newsnight on BBC Two and the BBC News Channel.  More From Our Partners Native American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgWhite House Again Downplays Fourth Possible Coronvirus Checkvaluewalk.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgInstitutional Investors Turn To Options to Bet Against AMCvaluewalk.comMark Eaton, former NBA All-Star, dead at 64nypost.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgKiller drone ‘hunted down a human target’ without being told tonypost.com last_img read more

What hackers? Most pharma execs feel secure about their data

first_img STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Despite a never-ending spate of hacking incidents, a majority of drug makers report they feel “more secure” about their computer security, according to a newly released survey.Specifically, 62 percent of pharmaceutical and biotech companies expressed confidence in their security arrangements, and just 14 percent acknowledged they felt less secure, according to the poll conducted last February and March by KPMG, the financial advisory firm. What is it? DAMIEN MEYER/AFP/Getty Images What hackers? Most pharma execs feel secure about their data Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. About the Author Reprints Log In | Learn More Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. Ed Silvermancenter_img @Pharmalot GET STARTED [email protected] Pharmalot By Ed Silverman July 24, 2017 Reprints Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED What’s included? Tags pharmaceuticalsSTAT+last_img read more

4 steps to reversing the epidemic of opioid use disorders

first_img About the Authors Reprints By Brian D. Sites and Matthew A. Davis Aug. 1, 2017 Reprints Brian D. Sites Tags addictionopioidspain Second, we need to develop and put in place health policies and practice guidelines — totally free of influence by the drug industry — that aim to reduce physicians’ dependency on opioids for treating pain. This may involve building infrastructure to routinely offer alternative therapies such as cognitive behavioral therapy, acupuncture, physical therapy, and access to mental health experts.Third, we need to carefully vet policies regarding financial reimbursement for outcomes such as patient satisfaction to anticipate any indirect effects on opioid prescribing.Finally, we need to quickly put in place regulatory policies to identify fraudulent prescribing practices and improve access to drug addiction treatment.Pain rarely kills, though we know of people in chronic pain who feel like it is killing them. But pain pills are actually killing astonishing numbers of vulnerable Americans. If we don’t resolve this opioid problem, thousands more will needlessly die.Brian D. Sites, M.D., is an anesthesiologist at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon, N.H. Matthew A. Davis, Ph.D., is an assistant professor at the University of Michigan School of Nursing and the Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation. First Opinion4 steps to reversing the epidemic of opioid use disorders Paraphernalia for injecting drugs in Huntington, W.Va. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images Several historic events led us to this juncture. In the 1990s, multiple professional societies argued that physicians weren’t doing enough to treat people in pain and needed to improve pain management. This advocacy was based on the notion that the current levels of disability related to pain was unacceptable. Based on the educational efforts of major US health systems and leading professional societies, pain came to be thought of, and treated like, a vital sign. In 2001, hospitals were prompted to create pain management standards, including the process of recording patients’ perceptions of their pain in a way that made it easier to assess and treat pain. The results of this social advocacy and regulatory behavior led to a skyrocketing number of prescriptions for opioids. But troubling data emerged from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Despite this increase, there was little to no improvement in Americans’ pain.advertisement Related: STAT forecast: Opioids could kill nearly 500,000 Americans in the next decade Related: Matthew A. Davis This poor correlation between increasing opioid prescribing and health benefits is sadly and starkly contrasted with the tight correlation between increasing opioid prescribing and rising health care expenditures, opioid abuse, overdose, addiction, diversion, and death.While the early advocates for the liberal prescription of opioids are no longer vocal, there continue to be insidious incentives to prescribe opioids. For instance, physician reimbursement is now closely linked to patient satisfaction surveys. There is deep concern in the medical community that overprescribing may be occurring as a function of the desire to optimize patient satisfaction.How do we start to make things better?First, we need to identify individuals who are at high risk for opioid use. Our new research on opioid prescribing found that Americans with mental health disorders such as depression and anxiety, a group that represent 16 percent of U.S. adults, receive more than half of all opioid medications distributed in the U.S. The high use of opioids among this population is particularly concerning because mental illness is also a prominent risk factor for overdose, abuse, and long-term use. [email protected] Health care professionals share a common and lofty goal: to minimize their patients’ pain. But what if we’re hurting more people than we’re helping? That may be the sad reality of the opioid epidemic, one driven in part by doctors’ desire to do good.The use and abuse of prescription opioids like hydrocodone and oxycodone is currently among the most significant health crises today. While Americans account for only 5 percent of the world’s population, we consume approximately 80 percent of the world’s prescription opioids. Overdoses from prescription opioids are the major driver of the 15-year increase in opioid overdose deaths. Overall, prescription opioids are now killing more people each year — 22,000 by last count in 2015 — than die from homicide.Why is the problem of prescription opioids unique to the United States?advertisement A ‘civil war’ over painkillers rips apart the medical community — and leaves patients in fear last_img read more